olympic lifting

Position USA Blue Suede Shoes 2.1 Review

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It seems like just yesterday I was writing the review for one of my favorite pairs of WL shoes of the year, the Position USA Blue Suede Shoes. I loved them, they worked well for me and I really had no issues lifting in them except that the pair I got was a bit too big for me. Most of all, they were arguably the coolest pair of weightlifting shoes on the market. Just as I put out that review, Position announced the Blue Suede Shoe 2.1, a version of their shoe that was slightly updated. Enhancements included a slightly higher heel, a more fitted feel, and a Vibram outsole. Being a big fan of the 2.0’s, I was skeptical about just how much better they could make their shoe. There has been a ton of requests for this review and it’s taken me 6 months to get my hands on a pair, but they’re finally here, so let’s get started.

Looks/Construction/Fit:

Despite the changes, the main points that distinguish the Blue Suedes are still here: suede-leather upper construction, hand carved wood heel, and the sexy blue color scheme. To the untrained eye, you wouldn’t even be able to visibly tell the difference between the two former and latter. The entire shoe remains the same in appearance with the only major changes being on the medial strap and the heel being stained a darker color. I have absolutely no issues with this, the looks were probably the main selling point of the original shoes and they still remain one of the strongest points of the Blue Suedes. The inclusion of a darker stained heel makes for an even classier look. For those looking for a not so “out there” color scheme, Position is releasing their “Redford” and “Eastwood” models in January.

From the wood heels being carved and stained to the uppers being sewn together, each pair is hand crafted and takes over a day’s work of labor to finish. Since the Blue Suedes are made in smaller batches versus your commercially mass produced shoes, there’s a story behind each one.  You’ll notice this in how not often certain sizes are in stock, but unfortunately also in the construction of the shoe, maybe the person that was making my shoes was just having a bad day. There are hot spots inside of the shoe where the metatarsal joints are, both on top and under the insole. On top it comes from where the tongue meets the toe box area, and on bottom it feels like its from the upper being stitched under the insole.  I usually have issues with my right foot rubbing in this area since I have a bunion, but with the P2.1’s it’s in the left shoe.  Oddly enough the majority of the fit issues are in my left shoe, though the right shoe suffers the same to some degree.

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Other issues include the logo already fraying and becoming un-stitched from the tongue, the loop for the medial strap not staying in place only on the right shoe, and the straps and laces being much longer than they need to be. The most alarming issue is that it feels like the heels are coming loose. I noticed this straight away when going to remove my left shoe, which once again is worse than my right shoe. You could alleviate this issue by not pulling your shoes off by the heels (totally normal to do though), but this shouldn’t be happening; I’ve never run into an issue like this with any of my lifters and I don’t remember it happening with the P2.0’s. It doesn’t feel like the heels are going to fall off anytime soon, but that’s not a good sign for lasting durability.

Like all Olympic lifting shoes, you’re going to want to make sure you size down half from your normal training shoes. While the P2.1’s have a slightly narrower fit than the P2.0s, I wouldn’t say that it’s enough to warrant going half a size up. The suede they use is fairly supple and should stretch a little bit over time. When I tried these on at the CrossFit Games I was worried they’d be too snug, but the pair that I have fits well, aside from the hot spots. Make sure you lace up tightly because you might get a bit of heel lift otherwise.

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Performance:

Fit and construction issues aside, the P2.1’s remain one of my preferred pairs of lifting shoes. Picking weight up has never been as fun as it is in the Position’s. Having just reviewed the Legacy Lifters, anything feels like a feather compared to them (20.03oz). According to my scale, the Positions weigh in at 16.37oz, only slightly higher than the leading shoes in weightlifting, the Nike Romaleos and Adidas AdiPowers. Moving your feet isn’t an issue, and the forefoot flexibility is actually much better than the popular picks probably because of the supple suede.

The greatest change to the P2.1’s is the decision to go from a .85″ heel to a 1″ effective heel; the majority of the weightlifting shoes fall into the 3/4″ category, .85″ included. The only other shoe I’ve tested with as high a heel was the Adidas Leistung’s, in which I wasn’t a huge fan of for cleaning because I felt the tendency to catch forward in them. Something about the way the heel to toe drop is more gradual in the P2.1’s makes me not have this issue to the same degree as the Adidas shoes. Cleans always feel more forward in shoes with a heel but front squats felt as right they do in other Olympic lifting shoes. I typically receive snatches in a very upright torso position to compensate for my shoddy thoracic mobility, and the P2.1’s one inch heel increases my ability to do so, which helps me out big time. Heel height is subjective and very debatable, but I haven’t had any issues with the 1″ heel of the P2.1’s. Typically, I would recommend a higher heel for those with longer femurs and/or crappy ankle dorsiflexion.

 


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Since the heel is also elevated more than normal Oly shoes, I have an easier time keeping my toes down throughout my extension; rocking back to my heels is a bad habit I have. Jumping feels natural and since the shoes are so responsive, I can move my feet with ease. The Vibram rubber outsole is extremely dense and paired with the wooden heel, should give you perfect power delivery with every lift. I was very excited to hear that one of the upgrades was the Vibram outsole, but there’s no pattern to it so the grip isn’t a huge upgrade over previous P2.0 – bummer. The insoles are also pretty anemic, as they are on most oly shoes, but at least they’re removable so you can swap them out with any orthotics.

While weightlifting is a joy in the P2.1’s, I recommend that’s what you stick to in the Blue Suedes. Just to test, I did a WOD which consisted of heavy power cleans and ring dips. While the shoes performed excellent during the ring dips, I had issues quickly setting myself into a low enough position to rep out the power cleans, so I ended up using my back for a lot of them. That and while the shoes are flexible, they aren’t flexible enough to be doing WOD’s in, so the plantar fascia burn was real.  Stick to weightlifting and squats where you can set yourself up better, in the P2.1’s.

Did I mention the P2.1’s make the absolute most bad ass sound when you stomp?!

 


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Value:

At $190, the P2.1’s fall in line with pretty much every pair of good weightlifting shoes out there. You really have to ask yourself if the style is for you, and if you would benefit from a 1″ heel. With a bit of practice, the 1″ heel could definitely be your ally; just look at the Chinese weightlifting team. Even if blue isn’t your color, you now have the option to go with a black/red or white/black color scheme. I’ve asked what other differences there were between the shoes and it’s just the color and some materials used, otherwise they’re all the same.

You could always opt for a mass produced technologically advanced lifting shoe like everyone else, but Position USA created the Blue Suede Shoes for those that march to the beat of their own drum. With that in mind, they’ve created something that actually feels special to wear, though I’m not getting rid of my Legacy’s anytime soon. Construction shortcomings aside, the Blue Suede Shoes are still one of my favorite pairs to lift in, because there’s just an undeniable badassery you attain from having them on.

http://positionusa.com

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Asics Lift Master Lite WL Shoe Review

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Asics is one of the oldest and well known names in shoes. While popular for their running shoes and fashion sneakers, Asics or Onitsuka have never really been known for their training gear.  It seems as if they’re starting to take the “cross-training” segment a little bit more serious with the releases of the Fortius, and earlier this year the Met-Conviction. Since weightlifting is such a huge component of cross-training nowadays, it would only make sense to come out with a “hybrid” Olympic lifting shoe as well.

One of the most sought after pairs of weightlifting shoes are the Asics 727 Tiger’s; you’ll mainly see the North Korean team still wearing them.  The allure of the 727’s are the tried and true materials they’re constructed with: leather and wood. That’s also probably why they’re so expensive and scarce. Most companies nowadays have already shifted towards more modern materials, but I wouldn’t necessarily say that’s a bad thing; it’s just different. We’re probably not getting the 727’s anytime soon, so Asics has taken their know how and created the Lift Master Lite’s.

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Looks/Construction:

Most weightlifters will probably scoff at the Lift Master Lite’s upon first glance.  They’re made with a synthetic leather upper, TPU heel, and in no way other than the Asics stripes, resemble the ever so famous 727’s. They resemble the original Reebok CrossFit Oly Lifters more than anything because of the heel and that the Asics logo kind of looks like the Reebok logo. I think the LML’s are a bit better looking because of the single piece upper construction and while I don’t think they’re ugly, but they’re definitely not as cool looking as the 727’s. I’d take leather and wood any day, but modern materials serve a purpose in not only keeping costs down, but keeping weight down as well. The Lift Master Lite’s only weigh in at 16.8 oz for a men’s 9, which put’s it right on par with the Nike Romaleos 2’s and Adipowers.

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Performance/Fit:

Asics seems to be marketing this shoe (what marketing?) as a hybrid training/weightlifting shoe, but to me they’re more of just the latter. Anything with an incompressible heel is going to be better suited for use on the platform and less for a WOD. The TPU heel found on the Lift Master Lite’s is just that, it’s made of solid TPU with rubber lining the bottom of the outsole; you can count on getting the most power out of every lift with the LML’s on. Comparing them to Nike Romaleos, the Asics aren’t quite as wide in the mid-foot area, but still provide excellent stability and grip during landings and squats. Superior to the Romaleos, is the spacious toe box; unlike the Nike’s, my toes don’t get all bunched up in the front. Probably the only thing that makes the Asics more of a hybrid shoe is that the toe area is much more flexible than your standard weightlifting shoe.

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Like the majority of the weightlifting shoes out there, the heel height is roughly .75″. I say roughly because on their US website, Asics rates the heel at .75″, but on foreign websites it states it as 17.5mm, or .69″.  To me, I don’t notice a difference unless I put a shoe of each height on each foot. What I definitely do notice is that the drop seems much more gradual in the Lift Masters than it does in the Romaleos. There isn’t any fancy lacing system, but the single medial strap does a great job locking the foot into place. The interior lining of the shoe is well padded and smooth so there isn’t any friction inside of the shoe. Overall, the Lift Master’s are a very comfortable pair of lifters.

Sizing stays true compared to most weightlifting shoes. Size half a size down from your normal training shoes if this is going to be your first pair. Basically size them as you would size your Converse Chuck Taylors. Weightlifting shoes should always be slightly tighter than your training shoes. For reference, these are my sizes:

  • 9.5 – Nike Metcon
  • 9 – Nike Romaleos
  • 10 – Reebok CF Nanos
  • 9 – Converse Chuck Taylors
  • 9 – Asics Lift Master Lite

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Asics has the Lift Master Lite’s at an MSRP of $140 and currently you can only find them on select shoe online resellers; on Amazon I’ve seen them as low as $100 though. For the MSRP, there’s a lot of tough competition seeing as how you can typically find Adipowers and Romaleos 2’s much cheaper than their MSRP’s nowadays. It’s going to be a hard sell since the Romaleos and Adipowers are the standards in weightlifting shoes. For $100, they’re far superior than anything else selling for that price point and it would be a no brainer.

The Lift Master Lite’s are excellent performing shoes and I think the worst part about them is the marketing Asics is doing. Most weightlifters are going to dismiss the shoe for being in the style of a hybrid shoe, whereas most crossfitters will dismiss it for not being Reebok, Nike or Adidas. It’s a shame that the Lift Master Lite’s probably won’t be used by more people because at the end of the day, they’re actually a very good performing pair of weightlifting shoes. If you’re looking for something a little different, or you just like the Asics name, you won’t be disappointed by the Lift Master Lite’s.

Reebok Lifter PR Review

Back when I purchased my first pair of weightlifting shoes, I had done a ton of research  before landing on the original Adidas Powerlift Trainers. Honestly, what drove my decision back then was price. Weightlifting shoes don’t come cheap, but they should last you quite some time before you’ll have to replace them. Back then I didn’t see that value and I was still shocked at the $120 price tag of Nano’s (look at me now). Four years later and there is still a lack of affordable weightlifting shoes. Reebok is looking to change that with the Lifter PR’s, coming in at a solid $90 price tag, but are they a solid weightlifting shoe?

The Adidas Powerlift hasn’t changed much aside from the way it looks. It’s still got a .6″ effective heel height, EVA outsole, $90 and for some reason it’s still called the Powerlift. That being said, it’s still a great weightlifting shoe and even top level weightlifters in the Olympics were rocking them in Rio. The Reebok Lifter PR’s share pretty much everything that make the Powerlift’s so popular, but have a few thoughtful changes. Since Adidas is the parent company, it’s not surprising to see a variant of the Powerlift’s branded Reebok’s way. What is actually surprising is that it took them so long to do it.

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Construction & Looks:

Though the price tag is significantly lower that most oly shoes, the Lifter PR’s are an exceptionally well built shoe. The quarter/back of the shoe is made from a synthetic leather while the vamp/toebox is made with real full grain leather. This is a huge step up from the Powerlift’s because leather tends to conform with your feet better and is also usually more flexible. Not even the Lifter 2.0’s have a leather toe box, so this is a step in the right direction. Good thing, because I found this area a little stiff to break in and also a bit narrow.

Cuts must be made to keep the cost down, so the heel’s construction is mainly EVA and rubber. There is a TPU plate connecting the upper to the outsole for a bit more stability, but I don’t think it does anything to help keep the outsole from depressing. Like the Lifter 2.0’s and the Powerlift’s, there is only a single “Thermo TPU” strap that covers the whole midfoot. It does a great job of locking your foot down, though it’s a little flimsy compared to the Lifter 2.0’s. The insole is a bit softer and thicker than on the Lifter 2.0, as U-Form also makes a welcome return. The weight of the shoe is 14.4 oz, so they’re featherweights compared to other oly shoes.

These are great looking shoes and I’m a fan of the minimalist design of the upper. They are not CrossFit branded shoes so there’s no crazy print all over them; the only logo is at the rear of the shoe and it’s not an eyesore either.At the moment, there’s only the white colorway available to buy, though Rogue has a couple more on their site that are pending release.

Reebok’s shoe fitment is all over the place and I think the Lifter PR’s are the weirdest of them all. I typically wear a size 9 in all of my oly shoes and the PR’s are still about a half inch too big in this size, whereas the Lifter Plus 2.0’s in this size fit perfectly. These shoes run abnormally long, so you might want to go a full size down. Fitment of oly shoes should be fairly snug.  A few of my shoe sizes for reference:

  • Nano 6.0’s – 10 (9.5 fits, but is snug)
  • Metcon 2’s – 9.5
  • Chucks – 9
  • Speed TR – 9
  • Oly’s – 9

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Performance:

Back when the original Powerlift’s came out, there was a bunch of talk about how an EVA outsole wouldn’t perform well for power delivery due to it being compressible. While that’s true compared to wood or TPU, it doesn’t make the outsole of the PR’s soft at all. You can depress the outside ridges of the outsole with your fingers, but the center is packed incredibly densely and does not give. Unlike wood or TPU, if land on the outside ridges of the shoe, it can depress; but unless you’re squatting over 500lbs the outsole should be plenty hard enough for you. If you were squatting over 500lb’s, you wouldn’t even be looking at an entry level shoe anyways. At the weight I’m pushing, the PR’s perform as well as any other oly shoe and I’m never at a loss of power.

Another thing that didn’t exactly wow people with the Powerlift’s was the heel height being .6″, with the majority of popular oly shoes being .75″. Those with mobility issues would benefit with a higher heel, but it’s a subjective thing, as I prefer a slightly lower heel. Comparing the two shoes side by side using stock pictures, it looks like the angle of the drop of the PR’s could be a little bit more aggressive than on the Powerlift’s. On the bottom of the left shoe, it says 22mm, which would be roughly .85″. UPDATE: The total heel height is 22mm and the drop is 15.5mm, making the effective heel height the “same thing” as the Powerlift’s at .60″. When I measured the Powerlifts, I came up with only an 11mm differential! Making them only .43″.

Compared to other model of oly’s I have on hand, it feels like:

  • Lifter Plus 2.0 .75″ – PR’s feel taller, differential feels more steep.
  • Romaeloes .75″ – Feels shorter.
  • Position 2.0 .85″ – Feels very close, but slightly shorter.
  • Inov-8 370 .65″ – Feels taller
  • Adidas Leistung 1″ – Feels shorter


 Sounds crazy, but with the exception of the Romaleos, all signs point towards it being actually being around .85″. That would be a huge departure from the Powerlift’s and even the Lifter 2.0’s. There’s also variances in overall shoe heights to keep in mind as well.  This is not concrete information and I’m not going to give up the search to find out what it actually is, but lifting with the heel of the PR’s felt just about the same to me as it does in other shoes, excluding the Leistung.

The PR’s have a heavily emphasis towards the midfoot, so jumping feels natural and they should be okay to WOD in since they’re a lot less clunky feeling. Toe off feels comfortable, but when you shift your heels the whole front of the shoe lifts off the ground. Due to the compressible nature of the heel, you won’t feel as planted to the ground as you would with TPU or wood heels; a trade-off for a bit of mobility. You should be fine if all you’re going to do is just squat in these shoes, but they’re less stable compared (a little forward) to my current oly shoe of choice, the Position’s.  I’ve had mainly positive lifting sessions in the PR’s, so I’m not that worried; it’s just something to get used to.

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Value:

Let’s get something straight, I don’t think these are the best oly shoes I’ve ever worn, but for $90, they’re great. Obviously  they’re not going to perform better than than shoes that cost double the price, but that doesn’t mean they don’t serve a purpose. Would I take them over my Position’s? Depends on what I’m doing I guess. If I have to WOD in oly’s, I’d take these any day. If I’m just lifting, I’d go with something a little more stable like the Positions or Romaleos. If you’re looking into your first pair of oly’s, don’t want to break the bank, or lifters you can WOD in, the PR’s should suffice, though I would probably do a little bit of shopping around for some discounted Lifter 2.0’s (or even Plus’).

Click here to get your Reebok Lifter PR’s!

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Pure-Strength 20kg Barbell Review

Man, this review has been a looooong time coming.  I’ve had this thing for a while now, decided not use it and then after I opened my affiliate, decided that it would be best to just have it there as another WOD bar; it wasn’t because there was anything wrong with the barbell or that I didn’t like it. In fact, it’s very similar to the Vulcan Standard, which I really liked.

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When you go through so many barbells, you can kind of get an idea of who’s actually behind making the bars (I could be wrong of course). So, when a different looking barbell comes up, it piques your interest; that’s exactly what attracted me to the Pure-Strength barbell. As stated before, the only bar that resembled the design was the Vulcan Standard, but a few things were off.  First, the Pure-Strength bar had dual markings; the Vulcan does now but didn’t at the time. Second, the Vulcan only came in bright zinc and still does.  Third, the tensile is slightly different, but that’s negligible. All a bunch of little things, but curiosity still go the best of me, so I bit. Anyways, let’s talk about the Pure-Strength bar…

The thing that caught my eye the most was the rounded edges that the sleeves have.  No other bars besides the Pure-Strength and Vulcan bar have these.  It actually gives the bright zinc sleeves both a very polished look, no pun intended. Both are still paired with an exposed bronze oil-lite bushing unlike the cast ones now found on Rogue’s bars. Spin isn’t the greatest, but it’s smooth and adequate for most lifters. There’s not a whole lot of play in the sleeves, so the bar makes a very pleasant “thud” when dropped with weights.

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The knurling on the Pure-Strength bar can be either it’s best or worst feature; users will either love or hate it’s light depth. Personally, I don’t mind light knurling and if I need a little more grip, I just chalk up. While the knurling is light in depth, it’s pattern is well cut and doesn’t feel choppy in your hands.  The start and stop points could be a little bit more refined though.  Like most bars nowadays, the knurl extends all the way to right before the sleeve attaches to the bar.  It isn’t just myself that is a fan of the knurl, this is one of the most sought after bars by members at my gym. Oddly enough, the 28.5mm diameter shaft feels slightly thicker than other bars that should have the same diameter (I thought the same of the Standard).

Like most popular bars on the market, the Pure-Strength barbell has a tensile strength of 190k psi. This is a multi purpose barbell that’s acceptable for all types lifting; excellent for functional fitness purposes. Don’t expect whip like a dedicated Oly bar, but it’s not awful either. It’ll suffice most heavier lifters and if you’re not going over 225lbs, you probably wouldn’t notice a difference here anyways.  It’s whip is right on par with other popular barbells with similar tensile strength and doesn’t really kick in until past the 200’s. If you need proof that this bar performs well, check out this video of ZA Anderson hitting #260 on “the big clean complex”.

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So in a sea of Rogue Fitness barbells, why would you want to go for the Pure-Strength barbell? Asides from quickly gaining a ton of popularity from being the gear supplier for a ton of high profile events (East Coast Championship), Pure-Strength actually produces really nice rigs and squat racks as well. Granted, it’s kind of iffy buying anything from anyone besides Rogue, as we’ve seen recently with Pendlay and Again Faster. Pure-Strength is still gathering steam and doesn’t look like they’re going anywhere soon. Not to mention, the Pure-Strength bar will only set you back $270 shipped (to CA), as opposed to the $320 of it’s closest Rogue competitor, the Ohio bar (or the Vulcan Standard at $279).

If you wanted a solid alternative to Rogue, that has less aggressive knurling, you’ll probably want to check out the Pure-Strength barbell.

Grab your Pure-Strength barbell here!

 

 

Review: Inov-8 FastLift 325

Going back a few years, when Inov-8 released the FastLift 335, I thought it was a revolutionary shoe. The first time I saw it, was at the Inov-8 booth at the 2013 OC Throwdown. From it’s good looks to some innovative (no pun intended) features that made it stand out as a hybrid lifter, I knew I had to have it. They became my primary lifting shoes for a few years, with me even preferring them over my Romaleos and Adipowers. So what made them special? The .65″ heel height for me was spot on. Call me crazy, but I always feel that .75″ heeled shoes push me too far forward. My ankle dorsiflexion is pretty good, but my hips are generally pretty tight, leaving me with a more forward position altogether. This is also why I prefer flat shoes to lifters when I squat and clean; but snatching, pistols and overhead squats, I will wear lifters for.

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I managed to score a pair of FastLift 370’s from being an Inov-8 tester.  Inov-8 changing things up again by the Boa dial system. I loved that shoe for the ease of slipping it on and tightening with a couple twists while retaining everything good about the 335 and just slightly increasing the weight. The newest iteration, the 325,replaces the now defunct 335. It’s more of an update to that shoe, featuring a  standard lacing system, Power-Truss heel, .65 heel height, it weighs a little less and some new colors. Honestly, I wasn’t planning on discontinuing use of my 370’s but I couldn’t say no at the opportunity to test out the newest iteration of the FastLift series.

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If you’ve never tried out Inov-8 lifters before, they make their name by providing the lightest oly shoe, that is stable, flexible and has a slightly lower heel than most oly shoes. Like the Inov-8 F-Lite 250’s I just reviewed, the heel is 17mm/.65″, slightly shorter than most dedicated oly shoes. Obviously the target audience in mind is one that would need to be able to go from lifting, to burpees to double unders while not needing to switch your shoes. Like all of the previous FastLift models, the 325 is capable of doing all these things without much issue. Will double unders in them be totally comfortable, no, but they’re doable and you’ll still get the benefits of having a rigid, elevated heel for pistols. You’re just going to need to compromise; compared to dedicated oly shoes, transitioning from lifting to gymnastics movements in the 325s (or any FastLift) is a breeze.

Being a capable functional fitness shoe is one thing, but the 325’s should be not taken lightly for a serious pair of platform ready shoes. Returning is the Power-Truss heel system that brings an extremely lightweight, but 100% rigid outsole for lifting. I really think the flexibility of the forefoot in the 325’s helps immensely with split jerks and even when you need to take a few steps to save a lift gone awry.  Some people have complained that the lightweight nature of the shoe is detrimental to stability; while you won’t feel as planted to the ground as Romaleos, you also don’t have to deal with the heft of them either. Once again, a compromise I’m willing to make because I have issues with moving my feet anyways; I don’t need anything slowing them down.

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When sizing the Inov-8 325’s, you should go with your normal shoe size. Typically with lifting shoes, I go half a size down because they run big. The 325’s are more trainer-esque and so is the last they probably designed it on; they fit more like a regular shoe than a lifter. For reference, I wear a 9.5, just like all of my other shoes, besides my Romaleos and Leistung’s that are size 9. Another thing to note, while the Inov-8’s may look more narrow than other lifters, they’re still designed with their standard fit. Fear not, these are not narrow shoes at all. While everyone’s doing all sorts of new synthetic uppers, Inov-8 chose to go with nylon rip-stop fabric with a ballistic nylon mesh in the toe area. The Power-Truss heel extends slightly upward and acts as a cup for your heel for added lateral stabilty. A single medial velcro strap locks down the top of the shoe and the outsole provides excellent grip with the “suction” cup design at the heel. As always, build quality is excellent and I wouldn’t worry about durability issues (my 335’s are still immaculate looking too).

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So what could be wrong with the 325’s? Like the 250’s, the lack of interesting color ways is probably the main flaw. Another thing, that isn’t actually Inov-8’s fault is that there are just other popular big brands that people will gravitate towards. I can see the weightlifting hipsters turning their noses up towards the Inov-8’s because of their dual functionality marketing, which is a shame, because the 325’s are a very capable shoe both ways.

For current owners of the 335, while the 325 is an excellent replacement, it’s just an evolution of the 335 and honestly doesn’t really warrant the upgrade for the loss of 10g. Unless of course your shoes are wrecked. For those of you looking for a hybrid fitness/oly shoe for the first time, you won’t find anything nicer than what Inov-8 has to offer (unless you REALLY needed that extra .10″). There’s just nothing that is as lightweight and comfortable to both WOD and lift in as the FastLift series.